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Vibration

Vibration
Vibration
Vibration

Keely
"Vibration is the rhythmical motion of a body within itself." [Keely See Oscillation]

"There is good reason for believing that insanity is simply a condition of differentiation in the mass-chords of the convolutions, which creates an antagonistic molecular bombardment towards the neutral or attractive centres of such convolutions. This may be compared to a knot on a violin string. As long as this knot remains, it is impossible to elicit, from its sympathetic surroundings, the condition which transfers pure concordance to its resonating body. Discordant conditions (i.e., differentiation of mass) produce negatization to coincident action. Pure sympathetic concordants are as antagonistic to negative discordants as the negative is to the positive; but the vast volume the sympathetic holds over the non-sympathetic, in ethereal space, makes it at once the ruling medium and re-adjuster of all opposing conditions, when properly brought to bear upon them. Josiah Royce is right as regards correspondent sympathetic association between two conditions. If concordance can be established, even of unlike states, no matter whether it be of the high tenuous forces of nature, gases with liquids, liquids with solids, solids with gases, the structural conditions can be perfectly adverse. Their neutral centres are the focalized seat of sympathetic concordance for controlling any differentiation that may exist outside, or in the mass that surrounds them. Certain orders of vibration can reach these centres and establish a concordant flow of sympathy, independent of any mass antagonism; in other words, certain orders of sympathetic vibratory transmission can correct and equate all differentiation that may exist between physical organisms and their cerebellic flows. Discord is disease. Harmony is health.''" - Keely." [Vibratory Physics - The Connecting Link between Mind and Matter]

Russell
"Silence is one - but sound springs from silence when its divided moving pair collide - so sound is three, and its vibrations in sequences of rest and action, are also three." [Atomic Suicide, page 109]

"The universe exists solely of waves of motion... There exists nothing other than vibration." [Walter Russell]

Ramsay
"While vibrations are the sound-stuff, the protoplasm of notes, semitones are, as it were, the atoms of which music is composed. We may think and talk of quarter tones and commas, apotomes and skismas, and dots, but these have no place as intervals for the musical ear, nor any part in the compositions which so charm us of the great masters." [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 20]

Different writers have put forth different views of what constitute a musical vibration, but their various views do not make any difference in the ratios which the notes of this sound-host bear to each other. Whether the vibrations be counted as single or double vibrations, the ratios of their relative motions are the same. Nevertheless, a musical vibration is an interesting thing in itself, and ought to be correctly defined.
A string when vibrating musically is passing and re-passing the central line of its rest or equilibrium with a certain range of excursion. Some writers have defined a vibration to be the passage of the string from one extreme of its excursion to the other, while some have preferred to define it as the passage of the string from the one extreme of its excursion to the other and back again. D. C. Ramsay has been led in his researches to define a vibration as the movement of the string from its central line of rest to the extreme of its excursion on one side, and back to the central line of rest; and from the central line of rest to the extreme of its excursion on the other side, and back again to the "right line," as he calls it, as a second vibration. His reasoning on this will be seen in what follows. (See Fig. 3, Plate IV.) [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 21]

The usual way of Reckoning a Vibration
CHAPTER II
DEFINITION OF A MUSICAL VIBRATION

Musical sounds are usually caused in the ear by certain vibrations of the surrounding air, which originate from solid bodies in a state of vibration from some force exerted upon them. Vibrations of the air require to attain a certain rate of speed before they become audible to the human ear; and they require to have certain ratios of rate of rapidity in order to constitute that beautiful host of sounds which constitutes the music of mankind. These musical vibrations may arise in the air from a vibrating organ pipe, or a vibrating tuning fork, or a bell, or a sounding glass, or a strand of wire or gut-string, or other rhythmically vibrating body; but to explain and define the nature of a musical vibration from the action upon it of an elastic string is to explain and define it for all. But before defining what a vibration of a string is, let us hear what others have said about it. Charles Child Spencer, Treatise on Music, p. 6, says- "It is customary in calculating the ratios of vibration of musical strings, and which answer to the waves of the atmosphere, to reckon by double vibrations, so that instead of saying there are 32 single vibrations in the lowest sound, C, writers on this branch of music say there are 16 double vibrations in this sound. This method of calculation, therefore, gives 256 vibrations for the fourth Octave C." Playfair, in his Outlines of Natural Philosophy, p. 282, says- "It is usual to reckon the vibrations of a string different from those of a pendulum; the passage from the highest point on one side to the highest point on the other is reckoned a vibration of a pendulum; the passage from the farthest distance on one side to the farthest distance on the other and back again to its first position, is the accounted a vibration of a musical string. It is properly a double vibration." Holden, in his Rational System of Music, says- "Mr. Emerson reckons the complete vibration the time in which a sounding string moves from one side to [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 22]

"the other, like as we also reckon the vibrations of a pendulum." Holden adds that Dr. Smith, in his Harmonics, reckons the complete vibration to be double of this. Lees, in his Acoustics, says- "The travel of a vibrating elastic body from one extreme to the opposite and back again is called a vibration. Continental writers define a vibration to be the travel of a vibrating body from one extreme position to the opposite. This corresponds to our definition of the oscillation of a pendulum." [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 23]

It is in their inverse relations that the major and the minor are equal. Every note, chord, and progression in the one has its reciprocal or corresponding note, chord, and progression in the other. This is the Law of Duality. And this general law of Nature is so deeply rooted in music, that is the numbers which represent the vibrations in the major system be made to represent quantities of string, these quantities will produce the minor system (beginning, of course, with the proper notes and numbers); so that when the quantities are minor the tones are major, and when the quantities are major the tones are minor.1[Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 44]

After vibrations the next thing is musical notes, the sounds produced by the vibrations falling into the ear. Sounds arise in association. There are no bare simple sounds in music; it is a thing full of the play of sympathy. Such a thing as a simple solitary sound would be felt as a strange thing in our ears, accustomed as we are to hear affiliated sounds only. These affiliated sounds, called "harmonics," or "partials" as they have also been called, because they are the parts of which the sound is made up, are like perspective in vision. In perspective the objects lying in the line of sight, seem smaller and smaller, and more dim and indefinite as they stretch away into the distance; while nearer objects and those in the foreground are apparently larger, and are more clearly seen. This is the way of a musical sound; one of its component elements, the fundamental partial, being, as it were, in the foreground to the ear, is large and pronounced; while the other elements are less distinctly heard, and are fainter and fainter as they recede into the musical distance in the perspective of the ear. Few have any idea of the number of these weaker partials of a musical sound. Tyndal's illustrations in his very instructive work on Sound show a string spontaneously divided into twenty segments, all vibrating separately, being divided by still nodes along its length; and a vibrating string will keep thus [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 58]

which seems to show that not only has one part of a vibrating string sympathy with another part of it so as to go into harmonic partials, as we have just seen, but as if the very air itself had sympathy with harmoniously vibrating strings; for Tartini observed that two harmonious sounds being produced and sustained as they can be, for example, by a strong bow on the violin, a third sound will be heard. Tartini's name for it was simply "a third sound." This is not an overtone, as Helmholtz has called the harmonic partials of one sounding string, but an undertone, because it is a "grave harmonic," away below the sounds of the two strings which awaken it. The subject of these undertones has been carefully studied since Tartini's day, and more insight has been obtained since we are now able to count and register the vibration of any musical sound. Helmholtz has called these third sounds of Tartini's "difference sounds," because when awakened by two strings, for example, the vibration-number of the third tone is the difference of the vibrations-numbers of the two tones which awaken it. The note C with vibration-number 512, and another C whose vibration-number is 256, the octave, awakened no third sound, because there is no difference between the two numbers - the one is just the doubled or halved; but if we take C256 and G381, its fifth, the difference number is 128; this being a low octave of C256, it has the effect of strengthening the upper one. Helmholtz found this to be the law of the third sound as to its producing, and the effect of it when produced. This third sound, mysteriously arising in the air through the sympathy it has with all concordant things, is another among many more suggestions that the whole Creation is measured and numbered to be in sympathy one part with another. The Creation is a universe. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 60]

The individual character of any note, and the comparative degree of contrast between any two notes in the system, depends on at least three different causes. The first is the genetic relation of the two notes. If the one note has 2 vibrations and the other 3, or the one 4 and the other 5, or the one 5 and the other 8, because of this, and because of the excess of the vibration of the one over the other, "a third sound" or "grave harmonic" being awakened between them, the different ratios have different degrees of complexity, and, in a general way, the greater the complexity the greater the [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 60]

We have gone from vibrations to musical notes; from notes to chords; and now we proceed to scales - that is, groups of notes or chords in succession, which are bound and unified in some clear and definite way. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 64]

If it be asked why no more primes than 2, 3, and 5 are admitted into musical ratios, one reason is that consonances whose vibrations are in ratios whose terms involve 7, 11, 13, etc., would be less simple and harmonious than those whose terms involve the lesser primes only. Another reason is this - as perfect fifths and other intervals resulting from the number 3 make the schism of a comma with perfect thirds and other intervals resulting from the number 5, so intervals resulting from the numbers 7, 11, 13, etc., would make other schisms with both those kinds of intervals. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 75]

In getting the length of a string, in inches or otherwise, to produce the scale of music, any number may be fixed on for the unit; or for the vibrations of the root note any number may be fixed on for the unit; but in the fractions which show the proportions of the notes of the scale, there is no coming and going here; this belongs to the invariables; there is just one way of it. Whatever is not sense here is nonsense. It is here we are to look for the truth. The numbers which express the quantities and the numbers which express the motions are always related as being of the same kind. The fractions bring their characters with them, and we know by this where they come from. 1/4 of a string gives a note 2 octaves above the whole string, no matter what may be its length; 2 has exactly the same character as 1; 2/4 gives the note which is 1 octave above the whole string; but in the case of 3/4 here is a new ingredient, 3; 3/4 of a string gives a note which is a fifth below the [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 75]

There is nothing extraordinary in this. It is another fact which gives this one its importance, and that is that the musical system is composed of three fifths rising one out of another; so this note by 3/4 becomes the root not only of a chord, but the root of all the three chords, of which the middle one is the tonic; the chord of the balance of the system, the chord of the key; the one out of which it grows, and the one which grows out of it, being like the scales which sway on this central balance-beam. Thus F takes its place, C in the center, and G above. These are the 3 fifths of the system on its masculine or major side. The fractions for A, E, and B, the middle notes of the three chords, are 4/5, 3/5, and 8/15; this too tells a tale; 5 is a new ingredient; and as 3 gives fifths, 5 gives thirds. From these two primes, 3 and 5, along with the integer or unit, all the notes of the system are evolved, the octaves of all being always found by 2. When the whole system has been evolved, the numbers which are the lengths of the strings in the masculine or major mode are the numbers of the vibrations of the notes of the feminine or minor mode; and the string-length-numbers of the minor or feminine are the vibration-numbers of the notes of the major or masculine mode. These two numbers, the one for lengths and one for vibrations, when multiplied into each other, make in every case 720; the octave of 360, the number of the degrees of the circle. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 76]

the excess of the vibrations of the one note over the other makes one or more sounds which are called "grave harmonics;" e.g., in the interval of the fifth, in the ratio of 2:3, the excess of 3 over 2 is 1, so the grave harmonic is an octave below the lowest of the two notes, that is, the ratio of 1:2. This reinforces the lowest note, 2, and gives it a solid effect. In this way the octave is incorporated into the fifth, and unity with variety is combined with the law of continuity at the very threshold of harmony. In 32 of the 42 intervals the grave harmonics are notes which belong to the natural scale. In the 10 remaining intervals which have not the exact number of vibrations found anywhere in the natural scale, 6 of them are from the number 7, thus - 7, 7, 7, 21, 21, 35; the remaining 4 are from 11, 13, 13, and 19. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 77]

The simplest condition of quantities and motions is in a string where half the length is double the vibrations. Next in the order of simplicity is a [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 79]


Cayce
"All force is vibration..." [Cayce (900-422)] "So is matter." [Cayce (1861-16)]

"Life in its manifestation is vibration. Electricity is vibration. But vibration that is creative is one thing. Vibration that is destructive is another. Yet they are from the same source." [Cayce 1861-16]

"All comes from one central vibration - taking different form." [Cayce (900-422)]

"Everything is vibratory." [Cayce (195-54)]

"As we see manifest in the electrical forces as used by man. This becoming only an atom in motion, and as the atomic force gathers this, producing such vibration as to create heat, light, and of the various natures, by the kind, class or nature of resistance met in its passage in the cycle given, reducing or raising the velocity, or better by the class of atomic force it vibrates, either with or against. These are examples of portions of universal forces." [Cayce (900-17)]

"Vibration is movement. Movement is activity of a positive and negative force." [Cayce (281-29)]

"Vibration is, in its simple essence or word, RAISING the Christ Consciousness in self to such an extent as it may flow OUT of self to him thou would direct it to." [Cayce 281-7]

"Electricity or vibration is that same energy, same power, ye call God." [Cayce (2828-4)]

"Life in its manifestations is vibration. Electricity is vibration. But vibration that is creative is one thing. Vibration that is destructive is another. Yet they may be from the same source. As in the electrical forces in the form or nature prepared even for use in the body." [Cayce]

"Q - What is my ray?
A - "Depends on what you are thinking. Remember life is vibration. So is mind. So is matter. As to the ray, this changes. Don't think you sit on a ray and it carries you along. You make the ray." [Cayce (1861-16)]

Dale Pond
A vibration is a rhythmic (periodic expansion (entropy) and contraction (syntropy) change of state; i.e., a periodic interexchange of seemingly opposite polar states. In each wave or vibration there are two distinct yet related unseen sets of dynamic aliquot parts or constructive currents (when considering a wave train or continuous vibration as a stream). This set of attributes is called the vibration's wavefunction. One set of attributes or parameters brings about the periodic concentration or aggregation of the vibrating media while the other set of attributes or parameters causes periodic expansion or dispersion of the media. If these unseen influences (scalar components) were not there and a dynamical constituent of each wave or vibration there could be no change of state as both states or phases would be identical and unchanging. The perceived wave or vibration is then the effect of these unseen causative (scalar) influences, attributes, parameters or currents. The details of these unseen causative (scalar) influences, attributes, parameters or currents are presented in Laws of Being, Laws of Being - Annotated, Wavefunction, Part 12 - Russells Locked Potentials and The Nature and Dynamics of Vibration and Toroids.

Vibration v Oscillation
These two rhythmic motions are not the same. Without vibration and oscillation made distinct seeming unfathomable paradoxes arise. For these paradoxes to be understood the difference between vibration and oscillation has to be clarified and acknowledged. In the ground state, at the moment of inflow of the sympathetic celestial streams or Divine Permeation (spark of Life), vibration is one cps and oscillation is one cps. From that moment on in the process of progressive rhythmic devolution, due to the Law of Harmonic Pitch, Law of Harmonic Vibrations, Law of Transformation of Forces and Law of Cycles, the One is refracted or differentiated into the multiplicity of materiality (the One becomes the Many). Demonstrating everything that is has a common origin or One Source and state of Being (sympathy; i.e., Love) regardless of outer appearance (opinion) of separateness and individuality.

What a Vibration is NOT
A vibration is not a sine wave. Sine wave patterns are developed from measuring a wave front passing by a measuring device such as a microphone or accelerometer. As the amplitude changes a sine wave is traced. I spoke about this in my 1994 SVP presentation on the video on this page Basic Principles. The typical sine wave pattern merely measures amplitude and Time. Such says nothing about the internal construct of the unseen (scalar) forces involved. [Dale Pond]

A vibration is distinctly different from an oscillation.

"Vibration is a periodic interexchange of state." [Dale Pond]

Christ Returns - Speaks His Truth
"Your entire universe manifests the differing frequencies of vibrations of consciousness energy particles.
As these frequencies move up or down from one level to another, so do the visible and physical structures manifest differing levels of energy and there is a change of mental patterns and emotions and appearance." [Christ Returns - Speaks His Truth, Letter 3, page 12]

"Visible things are but a manifestation of specific frequencies of vibration in consciousness which produces a 'SHIMMER OF MOTES OR PARTICLES' giving an appearance of solid 'matter'.
Each visible substance possesses its own unique vibrational frequency. A change in the rate of vibration produces a change in the appearance of 'matter'. As consciousness energies change so do the appearances of 'matter' change." [Christ Returns - Speaks His Truth, Letter 3, page 19]

Russell
"Rhythmic Balanced Interchange." [Russell]

Masaru Emoto “Existence is vibration. When we separate something into its smallest parts, we always enter a strange world where all that exists is particles and waves. The fact that everything is in a state of vibration also means that everything is creating sound. And as sound is created, there is a master listener to receive the sound: WATER.” [Masaru Emoto]

See Also


double vibration
Dynaspheric Force
Entropy
Hado
Laws of Vibration
musical vibration
Oscillation
Part 08 - What Vibration Is. - Part 1
Part 09 - What Vibration Is. - Part 2
Principles of Acoustics
Ramsay - The New Way of Reckoning a Vibration
Ramsay - The New Way of Reckoning a Pendulum Oscillation
Rhythmic Balanced Interchange
Sine Wave
single vibration
Sound
Sympathetic Vibration
Syntropy
Table 14.03 - Ranges of Forces Vibration Forms Types and Governing Laws
Vortex
Wave
Wave Field
Wavefunction
What Vibration Is
7.2 - Rhythmic Balanced Interchange
8.2 - Oscillation versus Vibration

Created by Dale Pond. Last Modification: Monday November 23, 2020 05:15:04 MST by Dale Pond.