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Effect

EFFECT: a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon or cause. See Cause, Scalar, Thought

Keely
"This experiment proves the truth of a fundamental law in scholastic philosophy, that when one body attracts or seeks another body, it is not that the effect is the sum of the effects produced by parts of one body upon parts of another, one aggregate of effects, but the result of the operation of one whole upon another whole." [KEELYS SECRETS - 1888]

Cause and Its Effects
Cause and Its Effects


Gustave Le Bon
"I must point out, by the way - and this observation will explain many historical events - that it is not only physical, but many social phenomena which can be likewise defined by curves possessing the properties we have just stated, and in which consequently, very small changes in a cause may produce very great effects. This is owing to the fact that when a cause acts for a length of time in a same direction, its effects increase in geometrical progression, while the cause varies simply in arithmetical progression. Causes are the logarithms of effects." [Gustave Le Bon, The Evolution of Matter, page 194]


MUSIC: "The mental impression produced by the performance of music, arising from the genius of the composer in the novel invention of pleasing or striking remedies, or telling harmonies, and the happy fitness of choice of certain passages, vocal or instrumental, in certain understood situations; or the clever interpretation of those passages by the performers." [A Dictionary of Music]

HEALTH: a symptom caused by an illness, belief or drug.

Illusion labeled and accepted as Reality
Figure 10.02 - Illusion labeled and accepted as Reality. Actuality (Truth) may be (and usually is) altogether different than the Perception.


Russell
Every effect of motion is voided as it occurs, is repeated as it is voided, and is recorded as it is repeated. [Atomic Suicide, page 287]

Ramsay
Effect here means, of course, musical effect in the ear's appreciation of the notes. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 28]

"lower effect than the fifth; the seventh, B, has a higher effect than the sixth; but the eighth, C, has a lower effect than the seventh. If the effects of notes or chords depended wholly on the mathematical primes by which they are measured and located, or the ratios inherent in them, then the effects of the tonic, subdominant, and dominant chords would have been alike, for these chords are measured by exactly the same primes, and have exactly the same ratios. It is the position of the tonic chord which gives it its importance and not any special primes by which it is produced, nor any special ratios inherent in it. Notes by the power of 2 have a pure unmixed and invariable character. Notes by the first, second, and third powers of 3 have different degrees of centrifugal force; and the character of the notes produced by the first power of 5 depends on the character of the notes from which they are derived. The final character of notes and chords is determined by the amount of force which they have acquired from the way in which they have been derived, and from their position in the system. And no matter where these notes may be afterwards placed, like chemical elements, they never lose their original forces and tendencies. What Tyndal says of the inorganic chemical elements of the brain is true of the inorganic notes of music, "They are all dead as grains of shot." It is the organic state which gives the notes and chords their gravities and (levity|levities, and these two tendencies, the one upward and the other downward, constitute the vital principle of music. It is true that the mathematical operation is required to give birth and life to music, and that the mathematical system gives the knowledge of causes down to the law of gravitation, yet the artistic effects are fully realised from the tempered system deriving its organic harmony from this vital principle of music. The centrifugal tendencies of the notes of the subdominant, are too strong to be at all disturbed by the system being tempered. The enormous power of these chords corrects the effect which might otherwise arise from tempering, as the enormous power of the sun corrects the perturbations of the planets." [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 29]

See Also


Becoming
Cause
Cause and Its Effects
Error
Illusion
Karma
Law of Cause and Effect
Materiality
Miracle
Ramsay - The Musical Effect of Notes
Reality
Resultant Tone
Scalar
Scalar Potential
Symptom
Thought
10.02 - Reality vs Actuality

Created by Dale Pond. Last Modification: Friday October 2, 2020 05:52:45 MDT by Dale Pond.