Loading...
 

Macvicar

Macvicar


Dr. John Gibson MacVicar went to the university of St. Andrews in 1814, where he excelled in mathematics and natural philosophy, and thence to Edinburgh, where he studied chemistry, anatomy, and natural history under John Knox's tutelage, together with rhetoric, Hebrew and church history (see Dictionary of National Biography). At this time he also delivered his first papers, on the germination of ferns and on the air-pump. He was licensed to preach, but in 1827 took up a newly established post as lecturer in natural history at St. Andrews, becoming professor in 1830. In 1828 he began editing and writing articles for the Quarterly Journal of Agriculture, assisted with the formation of a museum at St. Andrews and helped to promote the Watt Institution at Dundee. He lectured at both these places, and also wrote several books on natural philosophy in the early 1830s, in which he explained recent scientific advances and attempted to reconcile these with religious orthodoxy. Elements of the Economy of Nature, or, The Principles of Physics, Chemistry and Physiology appeared in 1830 (2nd edition 1856), and Inquiries Concerning the Medium of Light and the Form of its Molecules in 1833.

Macvicar's philosophy had a profound impact on Keely and was a source of many of his ideas.

Books
Elements of the Economy of Nature, or, The Principles of Physics, Chemistry and Physiology
Inquiries Concerning the Medium of Light and the Form of its Molecules
On the Nature of Things
A Sketch of a Philosophy
A Sketch of a Philosophy
A Supplement to A Sketch of a Philosophy

See Also

FORMATION OF MOLECULES
Law of Assimilation

Page last modified on Friday 18 of December, 2015 03:34:31 MST

Search For a Wiki Page

Last-Visited Pages