Loading...
 

nuclear fission

In nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry, nuclear fission is either a nuclear reaction or a radioactive decay process in which the nucleus of an atom splits into smaller parts (lighter nuclei). The fission process often produces free neutrons and gamma photons, and releases a very large amount of energy even by the energetic standards of radioactive decay.

Nuclear fission of heavy elements was discovered on December 17, 1938 by German Otto Hahn and his assistant Fritz Strassmann, and explained theoretically in January 1939 by Lise Meitner and her nephew Otto Robert Frisch. Frisch named the process by analogy with biological fission of living cells. It is an exothermic reaction which can release large amounts of energy both as electromagnetic radiation and as kinetic energy of the fragments (heating the bulk material where fission takes place). In order for fission to produce energy, the total binding energy of the resulting elements must be less negative (higher energy) than that of the starting element.

Fission is a form of nuclear transmutation because the resulting fragments are not the same element as the original atom. The two nuclei produced are most often of comparable but slightly different sizes, typically with a mass ratio of products of about 3 to 2, for common fissile isotopes. Most fissions are binary fissions (producing two charged fragments), but occasionally (2 to 4 times per 1000 events), three positively charged fragments are produced, in a ternary fission. The smallest of these fragments in ternary processes ranges in size from a proton to an argon nucleus.

Apart from fission induced by a neutron, harnessed and exploited by humans, a natural form of spontaneous radioactive decay (not requiring a neutron) is also referred to as fission, and occurs especially in very high-mass-number isotopes. Spontaneous fission was discovered in 1940 by Flyorov, Petrzhak and Kurchatov in Moscow, when they decided to confirm that, without bombardment by neutrons, the fission rate of uranium was indeed negligible, as predicted by Niels Bohr; it wasn't. Wikipedia, Nuclear Fission

Russell
"These great radioactive heat and multiplied frequencies are nothing, however, as compared to the intense heat which nuclear fission produces with plutonium, barium, radium and other radioactively explosive elements. They are a far cry from the flame power produced by the sulphur match. These elements have made a match for man which has produced a heat so great, and so quickly, that it has utterly destroyed millions of tons of rock deep down in an island and vaporized other millions of tons of sea water in a millionth of a second. The heat thus so timelessly generated is greater than the hottest part of our sun. That is what we mean by describing radioactivity as quick death." [Atomic Suicide, page 24]

See Also

Atomic Cluster Nuclear Fusion
Death
Discord
Disintegration
Dissociation
Entropy
Fission
Law of Atomic Dissociation
Law of Cycles
Law of Transformation of Forces
Law of Chemical Dissociation
Page last modified on Wednesday 29 of June, 2016 03:15:18 MDT

Search For a Wiki Page

Last-Visited Pages