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molecular envelope

"This molecular envelope, rotating with such great velocity, holds in its embrace the next subdivision of matter, the atomic. There cannot ever be more or less than three atoms in any molecule. These are placed so as to form a triangle in the interior; they rest in a condition of substance, or matter, we will term intermolecular. In this intermolecular substance we find an enormous energy or force in bondage, held thus by the rotating envelope enclosing it. Were we to rotate a spun brass shell, say nine inches in diameter, at a very much less rate of speed than that at which the molecular envelope rotates, - say nine hundred revolutions per second, - its equator would first bulge out, then form into an oval disk. A solid block of wood subject to such revolution would swiftly fly to pieces. The rotating envelope of a molecule, unlike these, the greater the velocity of rotation, the greater is its compression toward the center of the molecule. The rotation of this envelope is of such a nature as to produce an internal pressure upon every portion from every point of the molecule as a sphere. Were we to consider a rotating envelope as ordinarily understood, it would be one in which the envelope rotated around an equator having poles of no rotation; i.e., the poles would not possess the compressing force of the equator; the result would therefore be a compressed equator, and the intermolecular substance would pass out without resistance at the poles." [Keely, Ultimate Constitution of Matter and Action of Force Regulating its Phenomena]

See Also

Capsule
Envelope
Molecular subdivision
Rotating Envelope
Subdivision
Triplet

Page last modified on Sunday 12 of March, 2017 05:55:16 MDT

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