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intensity

The intensity of the sound produced by a vibratory body, depends upon the amplitude of its vibrations.

The intensity of a sound varies inversely as the square of the distance from its origin, only when the sound waves can radiate freely in all directions without interruption. [Harris, T. F.; Hand Book of Acoustics, 5th edition; J. Curwen & Sons, London, 1903?]

"It has been found by experiment that not only does the intensity of sound vary with the amplitude of the vibrations of the sounding body; but as nearly as the square of the amplitude. For instance, if a piano string can be made to vibrate so that the width of swing in its motion is one-fiftieth of an inch, and if another piano string giving the same pitch can be made to vibrate with an amplitude of one twenty-fifth of an inch, then the second will have an amplitude twice that of the first and its intensity will be approximately four times as great." [Piano Tuning and Allied Arts]

"intensity varies as the square of the amplitude" [Harris, T. F.; Hand Book of Acoustics, 5th edition; J. Curwen & Sons, London, 1903?, page 138]

"The intensity of a feeling or thought or mental image is, therefore, the important element in determining its subsequent physical materialization." [Seth/Jane Roberts, Session 525, p.66, Seth Speaks]

See Also

Amperage as opposed to Voltage
Amplitude
Inverse Square Law
Locked Potentials and the Square Law
Power
Sound Power
Sound Pressure
Square Law
12.04 - Locked Potentials and the Square Law

Page last modified on Friday 17 of February, 2017 03:22:06 MST

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