Loading...
 

Sympathetic Negative Transmitter

"Keely had shown him (Professor W. Lascelles-Scott) a peculiar apparatus, which he called a 'sympathetic negative transmitter.' It had been taken all to pieces for his benefit and put back together again. Imagine a globe in which is a vibrating disk, which Keely calls a 'cladna;' also, a series of tubes which, under certain circumstances, act like small organ pipes. Professor Scott said he could get from Keely no connected account which satisfied his English sense as to what these were but he found that a sensitive ear or hand could appreciate the responsive vibrations from these pipes and the apparatus appeared to be regulated upon something like a definite order or plan. For instance, he discovered that the sympathetic transmitter was sensitive to what is known as B flat, D natural and F and that it was also apparently sensitive to the notes D, F sharp and A. By questioning Keely he found that he regarded the first three notes and their combinations as having a tendency in one direction, which he called a polar force, and the other three notes a tendency in an opposition direction, which he called a depolar force." [Public Ledger, Philadelphia, April 16, 1896]

"Under date of November 2, 1891, Keely wrote of one of his researching instruments which he was then inventing, to overcome nodal interference in sympathetic negative outreach: "This instrument combines the disintegrator and the positive-negative-indicator in one. It will be but an intermediate, as between the sympathetic negative transmitter and the depolarizer. At present, I am working like a man suspended between heaven and earth, trying to reach one without leaving the other." [Newton of the Mind]

See Also

Chladni Plate Vibrations
Depolar
Focalizing Neutral Concentrator
Keelys Mechanical Inventions and Instruments
Musical Triplet
nodal dissociator
nodal transmitter
Polar
Triplet
Page last modified on Wednesday 14 of June, 2017 03:25:35 MDT

Search For a Wiki Page