Loading...
 

Electromagnetic Radiation

"Molecular repulsion Keely states to be caused by electromagnetic radiation. "Any metallic mass can be so impregnated with certain vibrations as to assume the mental qualities of repulsion and attraction." He terms the "radiating" vibrations as "positive" or "propulsive". Also, that like and unlike poles of a magnet will, contrary to accepted scientific belief, repulse each other regardless of their natural properties, when their differentiation induced by vibration becomes 66 2/3 of one pole against 100 of the other, and that when this differentiation becomes 33 1/3 of the one against 100 of the other, like poles will attract in the same manner that unlike poles have normal attraction. These ratios simply cause antagonism in one case and sympathetic attraction in the other, with consequent motion of their respective masses. Normally, however, the action of the magnetic flow is dual, being at the same time attractive and repulsive." [REPULSION - Snell]

Electromagnetic radiation (EM radiation or EMR) is a form of energy emitted and absorbed by charged particles, which exhibits wave-like behavior as it travels through space. EMR has both electric and magnetic field components, which stand in a fixed ratio of intensity to each other, and which oscillate in phase perpendicular to each other and perpendicular to the direction of energy and wave propagation. In a vacuum, electromagnetic radiation propagates at a characteristic speed, the speed of light.

Electromagnetic Radiation

Electromagnetic Radiation




Electromagnetic radiation is a particular form of the more general electromagnetic field (EM field), which is produced by moving charges. Electromagnetic radiation is associated with EM fields that are far enough away from the moving charges that produced them, that absorption of the EM radiation no longer affects the behavior of these moving charges. These two types or behaviors of EM field are sometimes referred to as the near and far field. In this language, EMR is merely another name for the far-field. Charges and currents directly produce the near-field. However, charges and currents produce EMR only indirectly — rather, in EMR, both the magnetic and electric fields are produced by changes in the other type of field, not directly by charges and currents. This close relationship causes the electric and magnetic fields in EMR to stand in a fixed ratio of strengths to each other, and to be found in phase, with maxima and nodes in each found at the same places in space.

EMR carries energy — sometimes called radiant energy — through space continuously away from the source (this is not true of the near-field part of the EM field). EMR also carries both momentum and angular momentum. These properties may all be imparted to matter with which it interacts. EMR is produced from other types of energy when created, and it is converted to other types of energy when it is destroyed. The photon is the quantum of the electromagnetic interaction, and is the basic "unit" or constituent of all forms of EMR. The quantum nature of light becomes more apparent at high frequencies (or high photon energy). Such photons behave more like particles than lower-frequency photons do.

In classical physics, EMR is considered to be produced when charged particles are accelerated by forces acting on them. Electrons are responsible for emission of most EMR because they have low mass, and therefore are easily accelerated by a variety of mechanisms. Rapidly moving electrons are most sharply accelerated when they encounter a region of force, so they are responsible for producing much of the highest frequency electromagnetic radiation observed in nature. Quantum processes can also produce EMR, such as when atomic nuclei undergo gamma decay, and processes such as neutral pion decay.

EMR is classified according to the frequency of its wave. The electromagnetic spectrum, in order of increasing frequency and decreasing wavelength, consists of radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays and gamma rays. The eyes of various organisms sense a small and somewhat variable but relatively small range of frequencies of EMR called the visible spectrum or light.

The effects of EMR upon biological systems (and also to many other chemical systems, under standard conditions) depends both upon the radiation's power and frequency. For lower frequencies of EMR up to those of visible light (i.e., radio, microwave, infrared), the damage done to cells and also to many ordinary materials under such conditions is determined mainly by heating effects, and thus by the radiation power. By contrast, for higher frequency radiations at ultraviolet frequencies and above (i.e., X-rays and gamma rays) the damage to chemical materials and living cells by EMR is far larger than that done by simple heating, due to the ability of single photons in such high frequency EMR to damage individual molecules chemically. Wikipedia, Electromagnetic Radiation

See Also

04 - Molecular Radiation
6.1 - Reciprocal Radiations
10 - Chart Defining the Angles of Radiation
12.30 - Thermal Radiation and Thermal Vacuum or Cold
17.08 - Gravitation and Radiation Russell
17.09 - Gravitation and Radiation Hatonn
Celestial Radiation
Celestial Radiation and Terrestrial Outreach
Celestial Sympathetic Radiation
electromagnetic
Enhanced Electromagnetic Spectrum Table
Figure 1.8 - Electromagnetic Scale in Octaves
Figure 15.03 - Opposing Forces of Gravity and Radiation
Figure 17.00 - Opposing Forces of Gravitation and Radiation
Figure 6.2 - Opposing Repellant Dispersive Radiations Neutralizing at Interface Plane of Inertia
Figure 9.4 - Radiation and Absorption interactions with Neutral Center
law of electromagnetic induction
motionless electromagnetic generator
Rad-Energy
Radiation
Radio Waves
Scalar electromagnetics
Sympathetic Radiation

Page last modified on Friday 03 of May, 2013 05:22:01 MDT

Search For a Wiki Page

Last-Visited Pages